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Professional Overseas Contractors

Professional Overseas Contractors

According to a recent article in military.com experts say, "There are a number of functions that contractors can perform, often at less cost than uniformed personnel, but not all tasks. And I think … where we get it wrong is because of force management levels or other factors we seek contractors to perform inherently military tasks,"

One example is aviation maintainers, especially in the Army and Air Force, he said. The Air Force has planned to hire temporary contractors to offset its 4,000 airmen maintainer shortage through at least fiscal 2020, even as the force will up its end strength from 317,000 to 321,000 airmen.

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mil-civ
mil-civ

There are literally hundreds, if not thousands, of overseas contract jobs for veterans available. But not all of these jobs are for “private security contractors,” you know, the scary-looking guys with even scarier looking weapons. While “private security contractors” are the ones that seem to make all the headlines, there are many other overseas contract jobs available.

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military

military

Raytheon, Lockheed Martin and BAE are among the largest defense contractors in the United States. They provide time, materials and services to the U.S. Department of Defense, or DOD, to the tune of several hundred billion dollars each year. You needn't be ex-military to get a job with a defense contractor, but it does help if you have a military background and you're looking for a job with a private company that seeks contracting opportunities with the DOD.

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When you apply for a security clearance you find the process has become a little longer than in the past. Some clearances may take up to a year or more. You may find yourself frequently asking your security officer for the status of your security clearance. And you may find yourself wondering what those statuses mean. Here are the most common security clearance statuses your security officer will see in the system of record:

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Professional Overseas Contractors - www.Your-POC.com

Professional Overseas Contractors - www.Your-POC.com

American citizens work all over the world in all sorts of industries. The most lucrative places to work are in the world’s hot spots. Civilian contractors are the brave people who find themselves working an ordinary jobs overseas and sometimes in war zones. You may wonder why people find jobs as civilian contractors. The answer is the adventure, but the pay is good, tax free and they make anywhere from $60k - $250k+ yr.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

Professional Overseas Contractors

During the Iraq war, private defense contractors providing security and support outnumbered troops on the ground at points. Contractors can enhance US military capacity but also entail risks. US experience with private security contractors holds several key lessons.

Over ten years after the war began, the Iraq war might best be remembered as America’s most privatized military engagement to date, with contractors hired by the Pentagon actually outnumbering troops on the ground at various points.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

Professional Overseas Contractors

By Ed O'Keefe — Interested in working for the U.S. government in Iraq? Though the dangers are obvious, the pay and perks can be pretty good.

Federal employees and contractors serving here face an almost-daily barrage of rocket attacks, the inability to travel freely, scorching hot temperatures and other cultural and linguistic limitations. But workers with the State Department, U.S. Agency for International Development and other federal agencies keep on coming, especially as the U.S. presence here becomes more of a civilian affair.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

Professional Overseas Contractors

Published by: RAND Corporation — From one standpoint, the employment of private security contractors can provide the United States with access to capabilities that would otherwise be unavailable or “would [either] take an inordinate amount of time to develop internally, or . . . be prohibitively expensive to develop” (Wynn, 2004, p. 4).

Proponents of this “valuable skills” argument claim that although the vast majority of private security contractors provide services that the military itself is designed to perform, a small segment of this group of contractors might be able to off er additional skills.

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