Posts Tagged “Antarctic Support Contract”

Working in Antarctica—South Pole

Post Date: June 23, 2017 | Category: General Information

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Managed by the National Science Foundation, the USAP deploys roughly 3,000 people to Antarctica every year to conduct scientific research, or provide support to researchers through the operation and maintenance of the research stations and vessels. Inquiring about opportunities depends on your area of interest; however, the majority of employees are hired as support personnel.

Workers there support scientific research on the highest, driest, coldest, windiest and emptiest place on Earth requires exceptional logistics and planning expertise.  A few of the unique challenges include managing the world’s longest supply chain, building airfields on ice and snow, Mechanics, cooks, painters, carpenters, cargo handlers, computer people, electricians, plumbers, forklift and heavy machinery operators, laboratory assistants, housekeeping, buyers, doctors and nurses, communications folks, welders, administrators, chefs and laborers, working

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Leidos officially assumed the NSF Antarctic Support Contract (ASC) from Lockheed-Martin. So what's the deal? When Lockheed-Martin was awarded the contract, after a 2-year delay, in December 2011 (they officially took over on 1 April 2012), expectations were that they would run things up through 2025 (4-1/2 year initial award period plus an 8-1/2 year maximum extension period.

So...what happened? Who is Leidos? And what does this mean to the program? For those who might consider this page to be TL;DR, I could just say that Lockheed-Martin sold their IS&GS division (where the USAP contract was being managed) to Leidos, but that would be an inaccurate oversimplification. If they'd just done that, there would have been major tax implications. So what really happened...??

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Leidos will take over work on the National Science Foundation‘sU.S. Antarctic Program as part of the company’s merger into the former information systems and global solutions segment of Lockheed Martin.

IS&GS has provided laboratory management, food services and information technology support to Antarctica-based research stations run by NSF since 2011 under the Antarctic Support Contract, the agency said Monday.

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Summer begins for contractors in Antarctica

Post Date: October 20, 2015 | Category: Around the World

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In McMurdo, September means the start of mainbody— also known as the summer season in Antarctica. This year, McMurdo welcomed two C-17 aircraft in mid-September, officially marking the beginning of season. With them came a lot of changes for the personnel on station. Of the remaining people who worked through the winter season, many flew off continent and headed home. In their place, each aircraft delivered more than 100 McMurdo personnel and grantees as well as some much-desired station supplies and personal mail.

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The last big plane left the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station on Feb. 14. Of the 150 scientists, technicians, and support staff, only 33 men and eight women remained for the winter: six months of darkness, no arriving supplies, average temperatures of -76F. Also: no Wi-Fi or cell-phone service. At the South Pole, iPhones become expensive alarm clocks and music players. Sunrise comes on Sept. 21.

Sitting on the ice—as well as buried one mile beneath it—are telescopes and other instruments gathering data to help answer questions about the changing climate here on earth, as well as the origins of the universe. The first direct evidence of cosmic inflation—the idea that the cosmos experienced exponential growth in its first trillionth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a second—came from a telescope at the South Pole called BICEP2 (Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization.)

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Because it lies in the southern hemisphere, seasons in Antarctica are the opposite of seasons in the north. Summer runs from October to February and winter covers the remainder of the year. The last plane left Antarctica around Febuary 15, 2015. For about the next six months  a staff of cooks, facilities workers, and a handful of scientists ( SEARCH JOBS IN ANTARCTICA ) — will see only darkness beyond the station's windows. At the South Pole, the sun sets in March and doesn't rise again until austral summer returns, in September.

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NSF and the USAP have been an anchoring U.S. presence in Antarctica since 1956 through its active and influential scientific research program, supporting fundamental discovery research that can only be done there and studying the Antarctic and its interactions with the rest of the planet. The program goals include:  understanding the region and how its ecosystems depend on the polar environment; understanding its effects on (and responses to) global processes such as climate; and using the region as a platform for fundamental research in every scientific discipline.  Antarctica's remoteness and extreme climate make it a unique and natural laboratory environment.

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Professional Overseas Contractors - www.Your-POC.com
Lockheed Martin has been selected by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to operate and maintain the support infrastructure for the United States Antarctic Program (USAP), which enables universities, research institutions and federal agencies to conduct scientific research in the region. NSF is the designated single-point manager of the program, providing funding for research in Antarctica as well as logistics and infrastructure needed by other federal agencies for their research there.  The multiyear contract is valued at approximately $2 billion if all options are exercised.

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