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Blackwater

Erik Prince

Erik Prince


Erik Dean Prince is an American businessman, former U.S. Navy SEAL officer, and the founder of the private military company (PMC) Blackwater USA. He served as Blackwater's CEO until 2009 and its chairman until its sale to a group of investors in 2010.

Prince heads the private equity firm Frontier Resource Group and served as chairman of the Hong Kong-listed Frontier Services Group until 2021. Prince is the son of an engineer and businessman Edgar Prince, and the brother of former U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos.

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"There are a lot of assumptions about contractors, and a lot of the assumptions are wrong." Those are the words of a private security contractor who asked to be referred to only as "Lloyd" for this story because like most of his colleagues he is not authorized to speak to the media.

By Lloyd's count, he has spent some 1,000 days working in Afghanistan in the past four years. He, like many other well-trained military men, decided to leave his position as a Navy SEAL and take his chances finding employment in one of the hot spots around the world where highly skilled contractors were well-paid, and in demand.

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executive outcomes

executive outcomes

Executive Outcomes is regarded as the leading proponent that effectively established Private Military Companies (PMCs) as an industry. Executive Outcomes was founded in 1989 by veterans of the South African Defense Force and registered in Britain in 1993. Executive Outcomes was nothing less than the world’s greatest corporate army that conducted direct combat operations on a sustained basis. On 01 January 1999, Executive Outcomes abruptly ceased operations after an extraordinary decade of diverse and controversial military actions across the African continent.

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erik-prince

erik-prince

2021 showcased the inability of the West to win small, long wars, and now, on the eve of 2022, the perils of far more existential big, fast wars loom over East-West relations.

These risks pose grave questions.

In the wake of the US humiliation in Afghanistan, and with fears rising of a potentially apocalyptic conflict breaking out over the flashpoint Taiwan Strait, how can conflict be better managed –- or even better, effectively obviated?

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PMC

PMC

Civilian contractors have frequently played an important role in American military operations. George Washington hired civilians to haul the Continental Army's equipment; supply vendors followed the Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War.

Indeed, today's military recognizes the use of civilian contractors as a force multiplier in stabilization efforts. Although sometimes expensive, contractors are capable of supplying immediate expertise and manpower much more rapidly than the military can grow subject matter experts.

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Blackwater

PMC

Blackwater USA took out a full page ad in the January/February 2019 issue of "Recoil" magazine with the company's logo and a message: "We are coming."

This article has been edited to clarify that Constellis no longer trains forces at Camp Integrity and that Blackwater, if it returns, would not have a connection to Constellis.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

Blackwater Founder, Erik Prince

The company has undergone a series of rebranding efforts over the years as an apparent means of distancing itself from overtly toxic connotations.

Prince’s Financial Times bio discreetly identifies him as simply “a former US Navy SEAL and executive chairman of Frontier Services Group,” a Hong Kong-headquartered entity. According to its website, FSG offers “security and logistics services in frontier markets”.

In an investigation by The Intercept, Prince’s activities at FSG were reported to include endeavouring to sell weaponised crop dusters in Africa as part of “what one colleague called his ‘obsession’ with building his own private air force”. As with many of Prince’s operations, a facade of legality has often proved elusive.

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justice

Professional Overseas Contractors

Blackwater successor Academi asked a Virginia federal judge on Thursday to toss a False Claims Act suit accusing it of falsifying firearms qualifications for U.S. Department of State guards in Afghanistan, arguing that the claims don’t hold up under the U.S. Supreme Court‘s recent Escobar decision.

In a reply in support of its motion for judgment on the pleadings, Academi pointed to the Supreme Court’s ruling this year in Universal Health Services Inc. v. Escobar, which noted that the FCA requires that violations be “material,” defined by the statute as something “capable of influencing” government payment decisions. Under this standard, former marksmen Lyle Beauchamp and Warren Shepherd have failed to allege that the government would, or likely would, have withheld payment had it known of Academi’s “supposed noncompliance,” according to the company.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

Professional Overseas Contractors

Blackwater founder and former Navy SEAL Erik Prince told Breitbart News Daily on SiriusXM that according to one of his “well-placed sources” in the New York Police Department, “The NYPD wanted to do a press conference announcing the warrants and the additional arrests they were making” in the Anthony Weiner investigation, but received “huge pushback” from the Justice Department.

Prince began by saying he had no problem believing reports that the FBI was highly confident multiple foreign agencies hacked Hillary Clinton’s private email server.

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Erik Prince, former CEO of private security firm Blackwater who served as a Navy SEAL and CIA asset, told Breitbart News Sunday’s Stephen K. Bannon that to win the war against radical Islamic terrorism, the United States must deny entry to people who pose a threat to America’s Christian way of life.

He said the United States could defeat the jihadi enemy by denying them sanctuary, money, and access to American territory.

“We have no obligation as a country to allow people in that are an inherent threat or could be an inherent threat to our way of life — to our Western Judeo-Christian civilization,” declared Prince, now the managing director of the private equity firm Frontier Resource Group. “It is open to all — freedom of religion, but not if they’re coming here to attack us.”

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Erik Prince, Blackwater

In a major new exposé, The Intercept has revealed that the Justice Department is investigating Blackwater founder Erik Prince for possible money laundering, ties to Chinese intelligence, and attempts to broker military services to foreign governments. Prince is currently the chairman of Frontier Services Group, an aviation and logistics firm specializing in shipping in Africa. But documents obtained by The Intercept show that Prince has also set up shell companies to offer paramilitary services to at least a half-dozen African nations, including Libya.

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Erik Prince

Erik Prince, founder of the famed private military contractor Blackwater, addressed the Bush-linked Maverick PAC and his remarks, as transcribed by the Daily Beast, were provocative. He thought his old outfit could have handled the menace of the Islamic State effectively:

“It’s a shame the [Obama] administration crushed my old business, because as a private organization, we could’ve solved the boots-on-the-ground issue, we could have had contracts from people that want to go there as contractors; you don’t have the argument of U.S. active duty going back in there,” Prince said in an on-stage discussion featuring retired four-star Gen. James Conway. “[They could have] gone in there and done it, and be done, and not have a long, protracted political mess that I predict will ensue.”

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Erik Prince, Blackwater

professional-overseas-contractors
A year after Prince proposed private troops for Nigeria, the West African nation is now using mercenaries. Prince’s old firm, Blackwater, used to contract with the U.S. to protect convoys and officials, and train foreign armies — but caused controversy when its employees killed Iraqi civilians.

Nigeria’s government is deploying South African mercenaries in its effort to battle the Islamist Boko Haram militia that’s wreaking havoc in the northern part of the country, the New York Times reported last week.

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Erik Prince

professional-overseas-contractors
When the war on terror has lost the founder of Blackwater, counterterrorism efforts could be in real trouble. Why Erik Prince thinks the national security state has become too big. Erik Prince is not the kind of man one expects to make the case for slashing U.S. intelligence and military budgets. After 9-11, his company, Blackwater, expanded exponentially, winning contracts to protect diplomats and politicians in Iraq and to train and work with CIA paramilitary teams hunting terrorists.

In an interview, Prince said the national security state he once served has grown too large.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

professional-overseas-contractors
We all know, Blackwater is no more but, Blackwater’s descendants are still scoring big jobs, providing training and embassy security around the world. With fewer contracts coming from Iraq and Afghanistan, consolidation across the security business means that the State Department — which remains heavily dependent on private-sector guards for its embassies and consulates — has a smaller and smaller number of companies from which to choose. That, in turn, means big profits for the remaining heavyweights.

Work on the last major Defense Department contract in Iraq was suppose to be Dec. 15, 2014 when the Iraqi government took over a U.S. facility at Umm Qasr Naval Base. The United States built a ship repair facility there for the Iraqi military back in 2011. U.S. military has continued to try and disentangle itself from Iraq even as a recent surge in ISIS sectarian violence threatens to undo years of hard-won gains.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

professional-overseas-contractors
Last week, four former employees of Blackwater, the notorious private US military contractor, were sentenced for the killing of 14 unarmed civilians and the wounding of 17 more in Iraq in 2007.

Paul Slough, Evan Liberty and Dustin Heard each received 30 years in prison after being found guilty of several charges of voluntary and attempted manslaughter. While Nicholas Slatten, the team’s sniper, was sentenced to life for first-degree murder for his part in the killings, which took place while the four men were working as part of a security detail for the US State Department.

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Blackwater’s Legacy Goes Beyond Public View

Post Date: April 17, 2015 | Category: Around the World

Erik Prince

professional-overseas-contractors
By the time four former Blackwater security guards were sentenced this week to long prison terms for the 2007 fatal shooting of 14 civilians in Iraq, the man who sent the contractors there had long since moved on from the country and the company he made notorious.

Erik Prince, the founder of Blackwater, a former member of the Navy SEALs and heir to a Michigan auto parts fortune, has spent the last few years searching for new missions, new fields of fire and new customers.

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professional-overseas-contractors
WASHINGTON — A federal judge on Friday rejected a last-minute request to delay the sentencing hearing for four former Blackwater guards convicted in the 2007 fatal shooting of Iraqi civilians.

The order from U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth means the sentencing will proceed as scheduled Monday morning in Washington. Federal prosecutors are seeking mandatory decades-long sentences for three of the four — Evan Liberty, Dustin Heard and Paul Slough — and a life sentence for guard Nicholas Slatten, who was convicted of first-degree murder.

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Blackwater

According to RT America, Statistics released last week reveal that the rebranded private security firm, known since 2011 as Academi, reaped over a quarter billion dollars from the futile Defense Department push to eradicate Afghan narcotics, some 21% of the $1.5 bn in contracting money the Pentagon has devoted to the job since 2002.

The company is the second biggest beneficiary of counternarcotics largesse in Afghanistan. Only the defense giant Northrop Grumman edged it out, with $325m.

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professional-overseas-contractors
According to the New York Time, Erik Prince billionaire founder of Blackwater was hired by the crown prince of Abu Dhabi to put together an 800-member battalion of foreign troops for the U.A.E., according to former employees on the project, American officials and corporate documents obtained by a reputable source.

The force is intended to conduct special operations missions inside and outside the country, defend oil pipelines and skyscrapers from terrorist attacks and put down internal revolts, the documents show. Such troops could be deployed if the Emirates faced unrest in their crowded labor camps or were challenged by pro-democracy protests like those sweeping the Arab world this year.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

Professional Overseas Contractors
Erik Prince has a message for ISIS: You’re lucky Blackwater is gone...

Last week, the controversial founder of the private military company had plenty to say about what the organization he once ran could be doing in the fight against the so-called Islamic State—and also why Republicans need to stop being such losers.

“It’s a shame the [Obama] administration crushed my old business, because as a private organization, we could’ve solved the boots-on-the-ground issue, we could have had contracts from people that want to go there as contractors; you don’t have the argument of U.S. active duty going back in there,”

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Private Military Contractor

professional-overseas-contractors

While this is a slight exaggeration, a recent examination by Sean McFate, a former Army paratrooper who later served in Africa working for DynCorp International and is now an associate professor at the National Defense University, suggests that the Pentagon’s dependence on contractors to help wage its wars has unleashed a new era of warfare in which a multitude of freshly founded private military companies are meeting the demand of an exploding global market for conflict.

“Now that the United States has opened the Pandora’s Box of mercenarianism,” McFate writes in The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What They Mean for World Order, “private warriors of all stripes are coming out of the shadows to engage in for-profit warfare.”

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Professional Overseas Contractors

professional-overseas-contractors
Frontier Services Group (FSG), a Nairobi-based company associated with former Navy SEAL and Blackwater founder Erik Prince, has announced it is expanding to the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The logistics company said it had entered into an agreement to buy a private DRC-based transporter for an undisclosed amount. FSG said the proposed acquisition will enable the firm expand to a market that is underserved.

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Erik Prince

professional-overseas-contractors
Erik Prince needs no uniform or medals to display his military credentials. Once you have seen his brisk walk, been on the receiving end of his vice-like handshake and looked into his steely eyes, you know this is indeed a man of military mettle.

But the former United States Navy SEALs member and co-founder of Blackwater, the private military company whose name is synonymous with controversy and the US-led wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, would like Chinese to think of him as just another civilian, but with something special to sell.

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Professional Overseas Contractors
Seven years ago, Blackwater Worldwide founder Erik Prince was on Capitol Hill, defending the company he founded as it faced allegations that his employees had shot up a square in Baghdad a few weeks prior on Sept. 16, 2007, killing 14 civilians and wounding 17 others.

Prince insisted that day that all of his employees had acted appropriately, and that a series of baseless allegations of wrongdoing” had been made against his business, which he’d built from the ground up in the 1990s. He bristled at the notion that his firm was a band of hired mercenaries, saying he and his employees “are Americans, working for Americans, protecting Americans.”

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