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military contractor

Joseph Cancel

Joseph Cancel

Willy Joseph Cancel, a 22-year-old American citizen, and former U.S. Marine were killed in Ukraine last week.

According to sources the contractor was originally from Orange County, New York, lived with his wife and 7-month-old baby in Tennessee, where he worked full-time as a corrections officer. After the war in Ukraine broke out, Joseph Cancel signed up to work for a private military company which then sent him to fight in Ukraine.

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When you apply for a security clearance you find the process has become a little longer than in the past. Some clearances may take up to a year or more. You may find yourself frequently asking your security officer for the status of your security clearance. And you may find yourself wondering what those statuses mean. Here are the most common security clearance statuses your security officer will see in the system of record:

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Saudi Arabia

Living in Saudi Arabia offers contractors and expat employees and their families the opportunity to discover a new country and culture. The conveniences of everyday life, including modern housing, schools, healthcare, and shopping, are all conveniently located in company-operated communities. Recreational activities in communities are many and include golf, swimming, sailing, horseback riding, and more.

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7 myths about living and working abroad

Post Date: April 7, 2022 | Category: Hiring Information

working abroad

There are many misconceptions about working abroad. Often, if we talk to friends or acquaintances that have been contractors in the past, they only mention the good (or bad) things about their experience.

Or, on the other hand, we sometimes only hear what we want to hear and think only about travel and paychecks. Consider some of the following myths and their explanations:

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Experts project that a security clearance can increase your salary anywhere from $25,000 to $50,000, and in some cases, even more. When employers do not have to invest time and money into a background check and the paperwork that goes with that, the saved money often goes back into the employee's salary. Former military personnel who have security clearances are very appealing to employers. In addition to the thorough background check that has already been completed, these employees are disciplined, dependable, and have strong leadership skills - priceless attributes in today's market.

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Military Contractor

Military Contractor

The U.S. Department of State awarded Constellis company Triple Canopy the Worldwide Protective Services III (WPS III) Baghdad protective services contract.

Constellis, a leading provider of essential risk management and mission support services to government and commercial clients worldwide, announced today that the Department of State (DOS) awarded the company’s Triple Canopy subsidiary a 10-year protective services contract in Baghdad, Iraq, under the WPS III Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) contract, with a $1.3 billion contract value.

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The Defense Base Act provides workers' compensation protection to civilian employees working outside the United States on U.S. military bases or under a contract with the U.S. government for public works or for national defense.

This general information regarding the Defense Base Act may be of interest to government contracting officials, U.S. government contractors, insurance professionals, covered employees, their families, and others in the workers' compensation claims community.

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civ-contractors

civ-contractors

A National Agency Check with Inquiries (NACI) is a background investigation primarily for government employees who will not have access to classified information. This investigation is appropriate for positions designated as public trust positions that require responsible and trustworthy employees, but with no national security impact.

The primary reason that the NACI is not an appropriate investigation for a security clearance is that a credit check is not required. When a security clearance adjudicator makes a clearance determination, the decision is based on the whole person concept as related to 13 adjudication criteria. These criteria are designed to help assess whether or not a person has demonstrated trustworthiness to protect classified information.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

There are a number of functions that contractors can perform, often at less cost than uniformed personnel, but not all tasks. And I think … where we get it wrong is because of force management levels or other factors we seek contractors to perform inherently military tasks.

One example is aviation maintainers, especially in the Army and Air Force. The Air Force has hired temporary contractors to offset its 4,000 airmen maintainer shortage, even as the force will up its end strength from around 265,000 to 290,000 airmen.

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Military contractors can be hired for different services, from repairing equipment to supplying transportation. Some may be deployed to conflict- or war zones for armed combat, while others can be trainers for military personnel. Many provide close protection or escort high-risk figures. There are also those who work in logistics and maintenance or security planning. Despite the wide range of jobs, however, it is safe to say that military contractors perform specialized jobs.

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If you want to become a private military contractor without military experience, make sure that you do careful research on the companies hiring non-military PMCs before you submit your application.

Well-known companies in the United States that you can consider looking into are G4S, KBR, Academi, Vinnell Corporation, and Northbridge Services Group. You can look for other top organizations online.

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The idea of leaving active duty for a contracting gig is a dream that many servicemembers share. And why not? Heading back to college at an older age or going from leading a fire team to working in retail can sound less than exciting.

Taking hard-earned military skills and applying them to a lucrative new career is appealing to many veterans. But is contracting all it’s cracked up to be?

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