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Professional Overseas Contractors

Professional Overseas Contractors

According to a recent article in military.com experts say, "There are a number of functions that contractors can perform, often at less cost than uniformed personnel, but not all tasks. And I think … where we get it wrong is because of force management levels or other factors we seek contractors to perform inherently military tasks,"

One example is aviation maintainers, especially in the Army and Air Force, he said. The Air Force has planned to hire temporary contractors to offset its 4,000 airmen maintainer shortage through at least fiscal 2020, even as the force will up its end strength from 317,000 to 321,000 airmen.

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The Benefits of Working Overseas

Post Date: October 26, 2019 | Category: General Information

Professional Overseas Contractors - www.Your-POC.com

Professional Overseas Contractors

The danger and demand of contracting jobs in combat zones may have benefits worth packing your bags for. Most contractors overseas make anywhere from $80,000  to $250,000 a year. Defense contracting has expanded dramatically over the last decade, particularly in the United States, where in the last fiscal year the Department of Defense alone spent nearly $316 billion on contracts overseas.

Many of the jobs for U.S. contractors can be found in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa. Regardless of your profession or ideal destination, there are plenty of opportunities for clearing professionals looking to make money and enhance their career and experience.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

It’s well known throughout the military that what you earn while in uniform is nothing compared to what you could be earning working overseas for a private security contractor, otherwise known as a private military contractor.

Although major combat operations have ended in Iraq and are about to end in Afghanistan, the need for these security contractors throughout the world will always exist. Many veterans separating from the military are interested in working for a PSC overseas. But before you apply, you should know a little bit about what you’re getting into.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

Professional Overseas Contractors
Getting a job with an overseas military contractor – a private military contractor, or PMC – isn’t difficult, if you have the necessary blend of training and experience. It also helps if you’re in top-flight physical condition and have a spotless police record. Duties and locations depend on the organization you choose to work for and the skills you bring to the job.

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Professional Overseas Contractors

Defense Base Act (DBA) for Military Contractors: 2013

The Defense Base Act (DBA) is an extension of the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act (LHWCA) which provides disability compensation and medical benefits to employees and death benefits to eligible survivors of employees of U.S. government contractors who perform work overseas. With a few exceptions, the DBA incorporates the provisions of the LHWCA.

  • Work for private employers on U.S. military bases or on any lands used by the U.S. for military purposes outside of the United States, including those in U.S. Territories and possessions;
  • Work on public work contracts with any U.S. government agency, including construction and service contracts in connection with national defense or with war activities outside the United States;

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Professional Overseas Contractors - www.Your-POC.com
This is a war where traditional military jobs, from the mess hall cooks to base guards and convoy drivers, have increasingly been shifted to the private sector. Many American generals and diplomats have private contractors for their personal bodyguards. And along with the risks have come the consequences: More civilian contractors working for American companies than American soldiers died in Afghanistan last year for the first time during the war.

American employers here are under no obligation to publicly report the deaths of their employees and frequently do not. While the military announces the names of all its war dead, private companies routinely notify only family members. Most of the contractors die unheralded and uncounted — and in some cases, leave their survivors uncompensated.

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